The First Futuristic Car in the World – Phantom Corsair

With an intention to create the first futuristic car in the world, Rust Heinz designed the Phantom Corsair under the Bohman & Schwatz Coach Building Company in 1938. According to the history of this vehicle from the shared information online, they recognized it as the first futuristic automobile created by Rust Hienz because of its unique style and features as opposed to its counterparts during that time.

After its completion, the company made a decision to show it in public on 1938 and it showcases a 6-seater automobile, but only has 2 doors with windows on both sides. With its clean overall appearance, it is definitely a futuristic-looking vehicle after almost seven decades.

The Pasadena-based carmaker truly developed the Phantom Corsair as one of their best units on the market before. To make the vehicle faster, the engine they used for it originates from the Cord 810 (Lycoming 4.7L 8-Cylinder) and it can run the car for almost 190 HP at a top speed of 115 kilometer per hour. Of course, this vehicle does not experience overheating problem on the road with its impressive Lycoming engine.

The overall body structure of the car is made of aluminum and a quality steel-tube pattern framework. The design of the wheels accommodates the size of the frame to allow the vehicle move faster when the engines function.

This first futuristic car in the world features push button automatic handles and not the typical car handles before.  It can also provide signal when a door is not properly close through turning on the radio or it has flashing lights. It features unique hydraulic bumpers, safety insulated cockpit, safety tinted glass and thermostats controller, among others.

During that time the costs of this supercar is around $24,000 (possible $400,000 today), according from the information online. Rust Heinz thought about of selling a limited unit amounting to $12,500 only.

Sadly, he died in a vehicular incident in July of the following year. This is the reason why the company did not pursue the production of the Phantom Corsair units because Rust is already dead.

To promote this vehicle also, the company made an effort to include it on the page of the popular magazine Esquire. From the shared information through supercars.net, it revealed that they utilize “The Car of Tomorrow” as its displayed name at the World’s Fair and became part of the movie The Young in Heart back in 1938. This is the movie of David O. Selznick and the car is “The Flying Wombat” in the film that time.

Unfortunately, nobody showed interest to invest for a Phantom Corsair because they find it costly at $24,000.

When Rust still alive, he was able to use the car and after he died, his family decided to keep the futuristic vehicle until the year 1942. A relative of the Heinz got the opportunity to drive the car after and they made a decision to sell it. Based on the shared information from the website, they sold it in 1950 to Herb Shriner who modified and improved the car with the help of BMW 507 designer Albrecht Goertz.

After the overall modification, Bill Harrah purchased the unit at an auction joined by Goertz. Harrah is a car collector on his own and so he made a decision to restore the original 1938 appearance of the Phantom Corsair.

For those who want to see the original display of this first futuristic vehicle in history, they can visit the National Automobile Museum (formerly The Harrah Collection) in Reno, state of Nevada.

Likewise, they were able to display the car at the Goodwood Festival 2016, Pebble Beach Concours 2007 as well as Amelia Island Concours 2009, according to supercars.net.

 

 

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